csth-yvvmaal0gw-jpg-largeIf you enjoyed Katie Bell’s reflection on BAVS 2016, be sure to stay tuned for more conference reports from our PG and ECR bursary winners. These will appear on the Victorianist, the official British Association for Victorian Studies postgraduate blog.

Earlier this week, ECR and (neo-)Victorianist Barbara Franchi reflected on the conference through an analysis of ITV’s hit miniseries Victoria (2016). She asks: ‘to what extent is the figure of Queen Victoria (and her representation in the show) Victorian, and therefore a later cultural construction?’

Below is an excerpt of the full post, which you can find over on the Victorianist:

In order to be neo-Victorian, a narrative notably ‘needs to be critically engaging with nineteenth-century fiction, culture and society’.[vi] With its intertextual references to literary classics, its serialised form and its self-reflexive tones on the epoch taking its name from the series’ protagonist, Victoria is a feast of nineteenth-century literature and culture brought to our screens. One could hardly find a more apt place to reflect on the contemporary fascination for the nineteenth-century past than the fictionalised story of the woman who, with her name alone, has made consuming the Victorians possible.

Read more at the link.

Image © ITV

Image © ITV

Hannah Greenstreet, a graduate researcher in theatre at the University of Oxford, gave an overview of the conference plenaries, as well as a more in-depth look at the music and theatre strand of panels.

Below is an excerpt of the full post, which you can find over on the Victorianist:

One of the things that surprised me as a BAVS novice was the interdisciplinary nature (and the sheer scale) of the conference, spanning literature, history, history of art, musicology and many others. It is sometimes easy to confine oneself to one’s discipline and forget that the nineteenth century was so much more than its literature. I found it immensely refreshing and exciting to have people with so many different perspectives and areas of expertise participating in the conversation.

Read more at the link.